Tag Archives: rare disease

A Message of Hope for World Rare Disease Day 2017

It’s World Rare Disease Day, and I feel more encouraged than ever this year. You see, years ago World Rare Disease Day was barely a blip on the social media radar. Few people knew about it, and even fewer cared. I’ve not even eaten lunch yet today, and I’m already seeing #WRDD17 trending on social media. Friends and family members have shared WRDD information- even those who are personally untouched by rare disease. It’s touching and encouraging to see the reach of rare disease advocacy expanding into new corners of my world.

I’m from a rare family. The scope of my immediate family covers multiple rare disease- so much so that my geneticist refers to me as a “geneticist’s treasure.” (In case you’re wondering, being a treasure chest of genetic abnormalities is way more of a curse than a blessing. The whole family would prefer to be uninteresting.)Roughly twenty years ago, my older brother was diagnosed with Wilson’s Disease- a rare genetic disorder which causes copper to build to toxic levels in the body. At the time, (when Internet and social networking were still limited) there was limited information about his disease available and even less support. My parents and brother did what they could to inform themselves, my brother and I, and others in direct contact with my brother, but at the time the spread of information was slow.

A few years passed, and my Mom was diagnosed with Retinitis Pigmentosa- a rare eye disease in which the back wall of the retina is damaged causing limited vision and eventual blindness. Again, she was alone in her diagnosis. The extent of empathy shown to her was the random people who tried to empathize with her condition by telling about that one time they had pink eye. (Lol, seriously, why do people try to empathize using completely unrelated situations?)No doubt there were a lot of lonely and scary days as she tried to process her diagnosis.

Fast forward to now. There are online support groups, research agencies report findings on social media and web sites, organizations like Global Genes make an effort to make patients’ voices heard. The world isn’t quiet as dark and hopeless as it was 15-20 years ago- when having a rare disease meant that you carried a personal responsibility to inform others. Are there still days when it’s frustrating to be rare? Heck, yeah. I imagine there always will be. But as a proud member of a family full of rare genes, I think the future looks bright. There are so many who are blessed with gifts of research, advocacy, and treatment that I believe will be able to help my family and I in the future.

So, on World Rare Disease Day 2017, raise your voice. Speak out. The time for silence is over. The louder our voices are the more likely we are to be heard. Awareness leads to research funding. Research leads to a cure. Care about rare, my friends.

Peace, love, and health.

Rare Disease in Small Town America

The shower head in mine and Joe’s bathroom won’t stop dripping. It’s incessant “drip, drip, drip” keeps Joe and I awake at night. I catch myself nodding my head in time with the drips. It has essentially become the metronome of our existence at home. We’ve tried everything to fix it. We turn the shower on and back off again. Sometimes that slows the dripping- other times it gets worse instead. We’ve cleaned the shower head and the on/off lever. Sometimes we push really hard on the nozzle in hopes that we’ll make the shower completely stop running water. It doesn’t work. Nothing works.

Now, some of you are saying, “Why don’t you change the shower head?” Well, that’s a fine idea, but it’s not exactly in mine and Joe’s skill set. You see, Joe and I have a variety of gifts and talents- none of which include plumbing. I mean, technically, Joe fixed our sump pump a couple months ago, but he used a couple dumb bells and duct tape to do so. I’m not sure that solitary experience makes him qualified to change out shower fixtures. I once fixed the toilet chain in a college dorm toilet (Seriously, Cumberland College, why was I fixing my own toilet?) with a paper clip, but again, that’s hardly professional experience. It has come to this- we need a real, licensed plumber. That comes with its own set of difficulties. It takes days of sitting around the house before a person actually shows up for non-emergency water problems. “Real, licensed plumbers” are way more expensive than mine and Joe’s pseudo- expertise. At this point, we have just accepted that the shower drips, and that’s a strange quirk of our home.

Why do I think you care about my plumbing woes? Well, I don’t suppose you do. However, the drippy shower has become my constant analogy for living life with a rare disease. My body has several medical “quirks.” The quirks are the background noise for every day. But, at this point, I don’t have the time, energy, or money to address the issues. Much like my dripping shower faucet, my aches and pains have become such a part of my existence that while I’m not happy with the situation, I’ve accepted them as part of life. My pain is not adequately managed, and I don’t always deal with it well.

However, small town medicine is about as effective with managing a rare disease as Joe and I are at handling our plumbing situation. I have great doctors, really. I am sure they are great with managing many common illnesses. I feel like if I were a typical patient and went to any of my medical team with strep throat or high cholesterol or any number of other common problems they could handle it beautifully. Let me be clear- my frustration is not directed toward local practitioners. My frustration lies in the fact that awareness is lacking, physician education is lacking, and I’m the one suffering. Unfortunately, when you’re a “zebra” in the medical community, your problems are anything but common. Even when my complaints are “common” there’s always a rare disease (and its complications) to take into account.

The people that are equipped to help me (you know, the ones who have actually heard of my illness?) are hours away. They’re in clinics with a two year waiting list. But, I’ve never really had a medical issue that I’ve thought, “Wow. This should probably be addressed 24 months from now.” That’s not how illness works either. It’s complicated. It really is. For my friends with complex medical issues, medical care is pretty much a gamble. We are begging to be heard (drip, drip, drip), but we are blending in with the masses.

I get it. I don’t expect that any doctor in small town America is an expert in any rare disease. I’m not blaming doctors for this discrepancy. I’m simply saying this life is difficult. My medical issues aren’t easily addressed, and I am tired of being turned away. My illness is a constant dripping that keeps me up at night- praying that at no point does the drip turn into a gush- and knowing that if it does, I’m poorly equipped to handle the fallout.

Peace, love, and health.