Category Archives: You don’t look sick

I’m sick, but I’m strong.

Hey, Crazy, Chronic friends! It’s already February- I seriously have no clue how we’re already into the second month of the year, and I’m still trying to remember to write the new year when I write the date. (Granted, I might still do that in August.)

January was a good month for me. My resolution for 2019 was to be more goal oriented, and it’s been fun to start taking steps toward meeting those goals. One goal is to lose 20 pounds before I move forward with a hysterectomy this summer. I’ve had this goal for a while, but I didn’t have a plan on how to get there. I’ve developed a plan, and I’m sticking to it- and I’m so darn proud of myself.

I’m identifying food intolerances.

I have been (imperfectly) Paleo since January 1. I’m learning that my body feels better when I eliminate certain foods. Without dairy, processed sugar, and grains in my diet, my pain levels are a little more controlled. Sometimes, friends, it’s HARD to go without foods I love. Now, I know for some people, food is just sustenance, and I am trying to develop a healthier relationship with it. However, for me, I comforted myself with unhealthy food when my pain was out of control, when I felt sad, or when I felt like I deserved a treat for doing something particularly difficult. Those little comforts were adding weight (and therefore pain) to my joints. I became suddenly very aware that I wasn’t comfortable being an advocate for the chronically ill when I was consciously making decisions that would make me feel worse in the long run. Does that mean I’ll never have pizza or chocolate cake again? Heck, no. It means that I am finding new ways to treat myself that aren’t self-sabotaging.

I’m getting stronger.

If you had asked me in early December, I would have told you there’s nothing at my local gym that I could do. The treadmill hurt my knees. The recumbent bike hurt my hips. No matter what I tried to do, something hurt. You know what? That’s okay. I’m going slow- embarrassingly slow at times. But, I’m learning that my body can adjust to hard things and get stronger. When I started using the treadmill/ elliptical, my knees were swollen and painful for the first two weeks. Normally, I would have quit- because I have enough joint injuries without adding another problem area. However, I decided to see what would happen if I rested, iced, taped, and KEPT GOING. You know what happened? One day I realized my knees hadn’t hurt my entire workout. My body has challenges and limitations. It’ll never run a marathon or competitively lift weights- but it CAN get stronger. I can’t begin to explain how proud I am to have discovered that. For the first time in my adult life, I walk into the gym not embarrassed by what I can’t do but proud of how hard I’m trying.

Here’s the thing. I’ve hesitated to share this journey with my blog community for a few reasons. First, I could fall off the wagon. A month from now I might read this blog and think, “Bless that wide-eyed child. She was so naively full of hope.” If that happens, well, I’ll have this blog as proof that I CAN do hard things. I can get back on the wagon. (I CAN even make a fairly tasty grain free dinner roll! Woot! Woot!) Second, there will be readers of this blog that won’t be happy for me. I understand that. I understand how much energy is required just to LIVE with chronic illness. I know how comforting food can be when everything else is miserable. I don’t blame anyone with chronic illness for their current state. Life is HARD- and life with chronic illness seems almost impossible. You CAN do hard things- but maybe the hard things for right now involve waking up and showering. I’m proud of you for that. Wherever you are on your journey through symptom management, be proud of yourself for doing the hard things. I’m cheering for you, and I’m so glad I have this community cheering for me too.

Peace, love, and health always.

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Fricka Fracka- What the Heck is BRCA?

Hiya! Howdy! Ahoy there, mateys! I’ve missed all of you. I have been so very absent from the blog lately, because I had no idea what the heck to tell any of you. So . . . I’m going to start at the very beginning- because “The Sound of Music” taught me that is a very good place to start. All of this is important, because it leads to a coming announcement for the Crazy, Chronic Life community- but I’m going to save that for a couple days.
If you’ve read our book, you know that medical research is important to me. So much so that I am registered with ResearchMatch.com to participate in medical research studies. Typically, it consists of me filling out questionnaires and submitting them to someone who is compiling data for a study. I received an e-mail asking me to participate in a genetic testing clinical trial at Vanderbilt University. All I had to do was allow the study coordinators to collect a vial of blood- and I got a $40 Amazon card. Character flaw admission- I will do almost anything for an Amazon gift card.
So . . . here’s the thing. If you allow someone to analyze your DNA, you will find out stuff about your DNA that you would prefer not to know. In my case, I got a letter (almost a year after I had given the blood sample) telling me I had a pathogenic mutation on the BRCA2 gene and should see my doctor immediately. Here’s the embarrassing part- I had no stinkin clue what that meant, so I shoved the letter in a drawer. I learned my coping skills from an ostrich apparently.
A month or so later during a check up with my PCP (I had lost 3 pounds since my last check up, so I was feeling rather proud of myself), I asked if he had any idea if a BRCA2 mutation was an issue. I’ll be honest; he did a google search in front of me. Then, he informed me that I had an 87% lifetime risk of having breast cancer. 87%, friends. Y’all, my boobs are trying to kill me, and I didn’t even know. He continued to tell me that the recommendation is to have a hysterectomy and oophorectomy by age 35 and a double mastectomy by 40. What the actual heck?
Now, I’m not the type to completely base my life on a Google search. So, I scheduled an appointment with my gynecologist- but remained relatively calm. I talked to Joe about it, and his initial response (and we’ve come along way since this time) was, “You can’t start cutting stuff of your body because you’re scared you might eventually get cancer.” To be honest, I agreed with his assessment of the situation at that point. Full disclosure: when I got the first problematic mammogram call back, Joe responded by vomiting, crying, and promptly melting down- in a public venue. Y’all, this has been an ORDEAL.
Jump ahead a few months, 2 genetic counseling visits, a high-risk coordinator visit, and a couple breast lump scares that turned out to be nothing, and I’m here. I have an over 80% chance of having breast cancer between the ages of 30 and 50. I have a greater than 50% chance of ovarian cancer- and an elevated pancreatic and melanoma cancer risk. I’m compiling numbers, so you might see higher and lower odds depending where you research. However, the point is, my body is just itching to make a tumor, because it has no idea how to NOT make tumors.
It’s been a scary few months- and the concerns have been so far outside of my normal realm of medical concerns that I haven’t felt equipped to process them. I haven’t told the CCL community, because I didn’t know where to begin. Now, as a new year is approaching, I feel empowered. While I had no idea when I entered this genetic study that I was going to get life changing information, I am grateful, because this information will inform my decisions (and my family’s- which is a whole different and serious blog) as I move forward. More importantly, I know to be vigilant about screenings and self-checks- things I had never considered prior to this information.
Why am I telling you all this? Because, I can’t stand for ‘peace, love, and health’ and keep major health secrets. Additionally, if you have a strong family history of cancer, I want to encourage you to have a genetic cancer panel. (I actually had a second panel completed in case the research study genetic test was flawed.) Waiting for results is torturous. The only thing worse is trying to understand and coordinate a plan once you have results. However, ultimately, knowledge is power.
I asked a patient leader group that I’m in what they do when they get a new diagnosis. I had literally no stinkin clue if I was supposed to be an advocate for EDS, POTS, chronic illness, invisible disabilities, and, oh yeah, BRCA mutations. I still don’t exactly know. However, if my story and my BRCA journey informs or inspires someone else- then I’m all in.

Peace, Love, and Health.

I’m not always Pollyanna.

So, I’m not always Pollyanna. Don’t get me wrong. I try to look on the bright side. I remind myself that this exact moment of emotions and self-pity won’t last forever. Joe and I are known for being the people who have figured out how to make the best out of bad situations. That’s who we are- and that’s what we do. But, some days it doesn’t happen.
Some days I’ve been awake most of the night with aching joints and tingling arms and legs. I’ve slept fitfully at best. New neurological issues haunt my body- some which I’m not comfortable enough to even write about yet. I feel like I am begging for help that isn’t coming, and I’ve been down this road enough times to know that it’s a long one. Today is a day where I’m aware that even if my diet is perfect and I combat all my inflammation issues, my body will still be affected by this disorder at the most basic cellular level. I know there aren’t enough trips to the gym to enable me to enjoy Disney World in a couple of months without the aid of a scooter. I even realize that holding my body together for a week of vacation is going to require an effort of epic proportions.
I’m not trying to be negative. I don’t write this for pity. I don’t want anyone to feel like they have to encourage me to keep going on (though I appreciate all those who have done that in the past). I won’t quit. I know this feeling won’t last forever. However, today I’m sad. I’m so pitiful, in fact, that Joe is cooking lunch and bought me surprises at Walmart (a Frozen toy, Saved by the Bell t-shirt, and chapstick- I have simple taste, friends.).
My point is- it’s okay to be sad sometimes. You can’t live in the valley of despair forever. I’m not suggesting anyone live a life of self-pity, because that requires more energy than any of us possess. However, give yourself permission to mourn your losses sometimes. Tomorrow, I start with a new physical therapist. Wednesday, I get a haircut. Friday, Joe and I have a date night scheduled. This week won’t be a waste- I won’t let it. But, today, I’m tired. I’m a little sad. I need girly movies and puppy cuddles.
The Braves come on in less than hour. The lunch Joe is cooking smells highly edible. Today won’t be the worst one ever, but it’s a bit more complicated than most. (Even this blog is short, because my fingers refuse to do what my brain is telling them. What the heck, body?) Occasionally, I feel like a fraud, because I encourage everyone to try to make the best of living the chronic life- and, to be honest, occasionally, days like today happen. So, here I am. I’m being totally honest with you, and letting you know I’m drowning in self-pity today. I promise I’ll return to your regularly scheduled Crazy, Chronic programming soon. But, today stinks, and sometimes making the best of it means admitting that and having the best sad, lazy day possible.
Peace, love, and health, friends.
Does anyone know if “Pollyanna” is available on Netflix or Amazon Prime? I need an outside, sunny disposition.

When People Say, “You Don’t Look Sick.”

Every person living with a seemingly invisible illness has lived this scenario. Maybe you’re speaking to a distant family member when it happens. Perhaps you run into a former classmate or friend from work. It could be the sweet lady who sits in front of you in church. Regardless, we’ve all been in those situations where someone says, “You don’t look sick.” It’s a double-edged sword of sorts. On the one hand, this person thinks they’re paying you a compliment. On the other, it only adds to the invalidation we often feel. So, let me make it clear to all those who aren’t living with chronic illness. I think I can safely speak on behalf of all those with invisible illnesses when I say- Please, for the love of all that is good and kind and understanding in this world, stop saying we don’t look sick. It just isn’t conveying the nicety that you’re trying to insinuate.

For instance, if I “look healthy,” there’s been some serious effort that has gone into that façade. I begin preparing to go into public hours before I go. I know there will be people who try to diagnose my current situation based on how I look that day. I save myself effort and aggravation if I try to look like everyone else. This has nothing to do with make up or wardrobe choice- it has everything to do with waking up in time for my medicine to start working before I go in public. It is about me achieving a manageable blood pressure and often using enough heat or ice to make my joints feel functional.

Let me try to explain. I look mostly healthy. Don’t get me wrong- I’m exceedingly aware of all the ways illness keeps me from measuring up to society’s standard of health. However, I look like every other thirty something for the most part. This means when I see doctors I often feel like I don’t meet the bar for what is “sick enough” for them. I typically feel that my smile or laugh or even pleasant disposition (let’s be honest, that comes and goes) inhibits me from getting the care I need. Quality of life is not easily quantified, so I often feel like it is being determined at face value rather than by my actual experience. It’s frustrating. So, when you tell me I “don’t look sick” you’re listing another problem that keeps me from receiving care- rather than giving me a compliment. I completely understand that isn’t your goal; however, I would be lying if I pretended that I perceive that phrase as some sort of compliment.

If I dig into that phrase a little deeper, I’m able to understand why it strikes me as hurtful so quickly. When we say that someone does not look sick, we are essentially telling that person he/she has no obvious disability. This means as my illness progresses, and I inevitably begin using a walker or wheelchair, I will start meeting society’s standard of looking sick. I won’t necessarily be any sicker than I am right now. However, as my mobility changes, I will meet the definition others expect me to fit to be “sick enough.”

Please, understand that I am not one to nitpick over semantics. If you say something to me with the best of intentions, I will do my best to perceive it as you intended. I am not trying to make anyone hyper-aware of their language. However, in this world where I believe all decent people are called to learn how to constantly be better and to make their language as inoffensive as possible, I want to challenge you to say something different. In all reality, it’s not necessary to comment on how anyone looks anyway. Try asking someone how things are going- and genuinely wait for a response. Maybe tell someone that you are glad to see them- rather than invalidating their illness, you are letting that person know you value your time with them. I feel like all of us are above commenting on someone’s physical appearance.

Oh yeah, and if you make a mistake and accidentally tell someone they “don’t look sick,” no worries. All you must do is add some empathy. Follow up with “but I understand that you really don’t feel well.” See? That’s all it takes. I promise- I will always appreciate your empathy and understanding.

Peace, love, and health, friends.

Overcoming the Fear . . . of New Places

I’ve talked a lot about how chronic illness has changed me. It’s changed everything from my physical appearance to my patience. One thing that continues to surprise me, however, is how much more nervous I am about new experiences now. There’s just so much that could go wrong. It may not- it typically doesn’t go quite as wrong as I imagine it will- but there’s always the very real possibility.
Let me explain using a real-life example from today.
Joe and I decided to visit a church where some local friends attend. Now, before this whole chronic illness and rapidly deteriorating joint situation began, I would have never thought twice about visiting a church. However, I’m a hot mess on any normal day of the week. Add to my normal hot mess having to dress like a real adult (you know, something that isn’t a Disney tshirt and athletic shorts), having to be ready by a certain time, and actually leaving the house before noon (I don’t really get a functional blood pressure until later in the day), and I’m an accident looking for a place to happen.
Today, while walking up the ramp into church (Shout out for an accessible entryway!), my knee quit doing the whole “knee thing.” I crashed into the side of the church to keep from falling. Joe, who is totally used to such shenanigans responded with, “You okay, Margaret?” I, of course, am now convinced the entire congregation thinks I came to church drunk and my name is Margaret. The second faux pas is way worse though. Today was Lord’s Supper/ Communion day at the church. It’s a beautiful service that I’m always humbled to participate in, but leave it to me to turn it into a debacle. As the deacons were passing out the communion wafers, they motioned for me to pass the plate to Joe on my left. Cool . . . except holding anything is complicated with EDS. I overestimated how hard I needed to hold onto the plate, my hand jerked awkwardly, and I spilled the symbolic Body of Christ on the floor in front of the back pew. Joe and I tried to clean it up- but those little wafers fall apart like chalk. And, you guys, it was just bad.
Now, don’t get me wrong. Church was great. No one asked me to leave- or even to stay behind and vacuum under my pew. All in all, I’ll call the day a success. However, that story brings me to this point- taking a chronic illness into public is a bit like taking a rambunctious toddler out among non-toddler humans. You have no clue how it’s going to behave. Yes, we all have socially awkward moments, and today’s mistakes could have happened to an able-bodied person, as well. However, the fact remains that the combination of chronic illness and me has turned me into a one woman wrecking crew.
There was a time when today’s events would have humiliated me. I would have told Joe I was never going back to that church again. However, at this point, I’ve accepted that these things just seem to happen to me. My body is unpredictable, and I doubt that’s going to get better with time. Here are a few things I remind myself to keep from hiding under my bed when social interaction turns into social embarrassment.
I’m not a celebrity.
I’m a somewhat normal 32-year-old woman living in Campbellsville, KY. Paparazzi could not possibly be less interested in me. I’ll never be featured on the cover of US Weekly (Thank goodness.). So, why on earth, do I think that anyone is enormously preoccupied with how I act? You see, in my mind, everything I do is amplified times a million, and I’m convinced the whole world is offended by me. I spend serious time stressing over my inability to sit and stand at the appropriate times during church. I just know that someone is hurt by my seeming irreverence. The truth? Most people probably don’t notice, and those that do are probably more worried about whether anyone is noticing that they’re singing off key or that their breath smells funky. I’m really not that big of a deal.
New experiences are worth the risk.
Today I participated in a beautiful church service. I met new people and visited with others I already knew. I even got a sucker after the children’s service. (I’m not sure how the minister knew I would really enjoy a sucker, and I’m seriously hoping I wasn’t staring at the candy box as though I’d never seen such delicacies before.) The experience of worshiping with other believers, sitting beside my husband during church, and seeing welcoming smiles on the faces of friends and strangers far outweighs any embarrassment I felt. I have yet to have an embarrassing public experience where I felt that my embarrassment wasn’t worth it to do something fun or new (although there have been a couple close calls).
People are generally great.
We hear a lot of stories about the mistreatment of those with invisible disabilities. I get it. There are people in this world who are jerk faces. However, for the most part, people are good. The deacon whose plate of communion wafers I threw in the floor? He chuckled good-naturedly and waved his hand as if to say, “Don’t worry about it.” The people sitting around me who noticed that I didn’t stand for all the opening music? They smiled and nodded and shook my hand when it was the time to do so.
The moral of the story? I’m a mess. That’s okay. People are cool. Keep taking risks- and learn to laugh at your failures along the way.

Peace, love, and health, friends.

Click here to endorse me for WEGO Health’s Patient Leader award, please.

I’m Pretty Sure You Want This Book.

This (link at the bottom) is my book. Okay, technically, it’s Joe’s book too, because he did a lot of work on it. But since I’m the person with the chronic illness and this is a book about chronic illness- well, I’m a little emotionally attached. Just in case you’re thinking you don’t need this book or don’t especially want it, humor me while I make my case.

So, here are the “Crazy, Chronic Reasons Why You (might) Want to Read This Book.”

  1. It’s a beautiful love story. Okay, it’s not exactly a beautiful love story. As a matter of fact, I mention bodily functions that are neither beautiful nor lovely a couple times. However, Joe and I wrote this together. He literally saw my desire to write a book and not only encouraged it- he did a lot of the work. We talked through every chapter together before I wrote it. He physically typed a lot of the book, because my crazy, dislocating hands wouldn’t allow me. We have called ourselves #TeamEarly from the beginning, and this collaboration showcases exactly why. We work together. We laugh together- and, when necessary, we cry together. So, while a book instructing you with how to cope with very public and very projectile vomit isn’t exactly romantic, the love and cooperation that went into each page certainly is.
  2. It’s likely to boost your confidence. Do you want to know why it will boost your confidence? Because as you read through this book and experience our raw honesty, there will be times when you’ll think, “I would never be dumb enough to get myself in that situation.” See? You’ll feel smarter. Okay, seriously, this book talks about embarrassing symptoms that so many of us face- brain fog, incontinence, mobility struggles, etc. Let’s be honest- I’m about as graceful as an elephant changing underpants. I have a long history of blunders to share. I will give you tips to saving face as much as possible when your body decides to be a jerk in the least convenient of places. Personally, I always feel more confident when I have a contingency plan.
  3. People seem to actually like the book. You guys, I have reviews, and they’re not bad. They’re actually, well, great! Even more impressively, to the best of my knowledge I am not related (by blood nor marriage) to anyone who has reviewed my book. You never know when you write something if it will reach your audience in the way you hope. There’s a chance that Joe and I have been drafting and typing our little hearts out on a project that stinks. But . . . it’s beginning to look like it doesn’t. I actually believe we may have accurately portrayed this life in a way that others can relate.
  4. It will make you cool. Okay, there are many words that could describe me, and “cool” will never be one of them. I will never listen to the right music or understand pop culture references. However, illness has made me more sensitive to the needs of my chronically ill/ disabled friends. We have done our best to convey to significant others, caregivers, friends, congregations, and ‘that lady from WalMart’ how to be aware of the needs of others. And, seriously, what’s cooler than compassion? Am I right?
  5. I will appreciate your support forever. Everyone isn’t in a place where they can buy a book. I understand that completely. Please know that every word of encouragement, like, and share mean the world to me. My Crazy, Chronic Life blog audience was the driving force behind this book, and your love and encouragement help me keep my head above water on the hardest days.

Friends, each of you have encouraged Joe and I throughout this process, and we truly appreciate it. (I considered telling everyone that to show our gratitude Joe would be available to sing at the wedding of anyone who buys our book. Strangely, he didn’t consent to that.) So, one more time for the people in the back- my book link is below. Try an excerpt. See if it’s for you- or if it might help someone you know.

Peace, love, and health to each of you.

We’re Going to Disney World- and I have to take EDS with me.

Y’all, I’m going back to Disney World in a few days, and I am beyond excited. Okay, at this exact moment, I’m beyond stressed. I hate packing. I hate preparing to leave. I’ll sum it up like this- Tonight’s dinner came from Dollar Tree, because I was too tired to walk through the grocery store. (I bought frozen vegetables. I feel like I deserve a medal for not deciding tonight’s dinner would be peach rings and circus peanuts.) I’m trying to rest, so I’ll feel decent once we get to Disney. But, seriously, who has time to rest when they’re preparing for a trip?

I’m going to let all of you in on a secret. Last year’s Disney trip wasn’t exactly stellar. Don’t get me wrong; Joe and I had a great time. But I sort of fell apart. My neck developed new pain (I didn’t think that was possible) so severe that I actually lost vision in one eye for a while. That whole situation never fully resolved. (Although, both eyes work again, thankfully.) I missed an entire day of fun, because I couldn’t keep food down. I’m guessing my problem was a combination of dehydration and pain, but I’m not entirely sure. The skin on my forearms literally fell off, because EDS skin and vinyl arm rests on wheelchairs (with the addition of 100 degree Florida heat) are apparently opposed to one another. In short, I was a mess.

In order to go back to the Most Magical Place On Earth, I’ve had to make a few changes. And since a lot of my blog readers are also living the chronic life, I thought I’d share my changes in hopes they’ll help someone else enjoy their vacation with relatively few medical meltdowns.

I’m leaving Snookie at home.

If you’re new to the blog, you might be wondering why I’m leaving my (very unfortunately named) child at home. Snookie is my wheelchair, and she’s basically been my bestie for the past three years. BUT, I’ve outgrown her in terms of needs. (Yes, I can still fit myself into Snooks.) Snookie, though fabulous, is a very bumpy ride, and Disney World tends to have rough pavement anyway. My neck and back are no longer well-suited for the bumpiness of a manual wheelchair. (I’m sure Joe’s back is duly grateful.)

Instead, I’m renting a scooter for the first time. I ran across an amazing company called “Disney World Scooter Rental” that will deliver a scooter to my hotel and provide on-site user training (Yikes! You can expect to see a video of that hot mess.). I came across DWSR when I saw a post they had made defending their clients who need to use mobility devices in the park. They were responding to a comment on their site about how those with disabilities should just stay home. (People are jerks sometimes, am I right?) Anyway, DWSR replied to the comment in defense of all of us who deserve to enjoy their vacation just as much as our able-bodied counterparts. I instantly fell in love with the company, and I am excited to try their services. They’ve already been awesome at answering my questions when I needed to find a scooter model to rent that wasn’t difficult on my upper body to maneuver. (The scooters that require you to push a button with your thumb to accelerate cause my thumbs to dislocate.) I’ll leave a full review after the trip, but I’m expecting this to be a great experience.

For those of you wondering, the new wheelchair will be named after another super obnoxious reality star- Abby Lee. (Although, I think the real AL is serving time in prison now, so maybe I should name her Free Abby Lee instead.)

Amazon Prime delivers to Disney.

I love Amazon Prime. I mean, it’s shameful how much stuff I purchase via Prime. I have no clue why this hasn’t occurred to me sooner, but I can order stuff through Prime to be sent to my hotel! Why is this so exciting? Last year, I struggled with hydration. Yes, you can get free water at any counter service restaurant in the parks. However, my body isn’t patient enough to wait until I get up, get ready, wait in line for the bus and security, and actually get into the park before I start hydrating. Not to mention that water isn’t exactly the gold standard for hydration when you’re medically complicated. (Electrolytes are important, kids.) My problem last year was that I would tell Joe, “No, I’m fine. I can finish my water bottle from last night rather than buy a Gatorade for $4 before we leave the hotel.” Then, I would get to the park and already be dehydrated, tachycardic, and nauseous from the Florida heat before we started our day.

This year, I’ve ordered water, Gatorade, and breakfast bars for our hotel room. I contacted Disney to make sure this is okay, and they sent me the address (and a warning that I might have to pay a $5 handling fee- basically the cost of 1 gatorade).

For those of you keeping score, that means I’ve found an affordable solution to my Disney related hydration issues as well.

Hot/ Cold packs- duh.

I am nothing without my heating pad and ice packs. I have no clue why it didn’t occur to me to take them with me on vacation. Last year, I was trying to “ice” my head and neck with the condensation on my Disney mug. Not exactly helpful. This year, I’ve bought a few hot/ cold packs (that can be frozen or microwave) to take with me. I don’t plan to take them with me into the parks- although that could happen. My plan is to use them in the evening when I’m trying to melt off some of the pain of the day. Again, I’m not sure why I didn’t think of this sooner.

I’ve addressed mobility, hydration, and pain management issues from last year. It’s not a perfect plan, because the reality of vacation with a chronic illness is that anything can happen. However, I’m learning every year. Joe and I love Disney World, and I don’t plan to give up our trips without one heck of a fight. If you want to join us on our trip, make sure you like my blogger page- CrazyChronicLife We plan to do some live videos of the things we see and do at WDW. I’ll upload pictures, videos, and live events to the page.

Also, it’s a little early to be spilling these particular beans, but Joe and I are planning to release our co-authored chronic illness guidebook as soon as we return from Disney World. I’ll give more details as we get closer to the release date, so, for now, just join us for vacationing fun.

Peace. Love. Health.
And, oh yeah, Mouse Ears.