Category Archives: World Rare Disease Day

I’m sick, but I’m strong.

Hey, Crazy, Chronic friends! It’s already February- I seriously have no clue how we’re already into the second month of the year, and I’m still trying to remember to write the new year when I write the date. (Granted, I might still do that in August.)

January was a good month for me. My resolution for 2019 was to be more goal oriented, and it’s been fun to start taking steps toward meeting those goals. One goal is to lose 20 pounds before I move forward with a hysterectomy this summer. I’ve had this goal for a while, but I didn’t have a plan on how to get there. I’ve developed a plan, and I’m sticking to it- and I’m so darn proud of myself.

I’m identifying food intolerances.

I have been (imperfectly) Paleo since January 1. I’m learning that my body feels better when I eliminate certain foods. Without dairy, processed sugar, and grains in my diet, my pain levels are a little more controlled. Sometimes, friends, it’s HARD to go without foods I love. Now, I know for some people, food is just sustenance, and I am trying to develop a healthier relationship with it. However, for me, I comforted myself with unhealthy food when my pain was out of control, when I felt sad, or when I felt like I deserved a treat for doing something particularly difficult. Those little comforts were adding weight (and therefore pain) to my joints. I became suddenly very aware that I wasn’t comfortable being an advocate for the chronically ill when I was consciously making decisions that would make me feel worse in the long run. Does that mean I’ll never have pizza or chocolate cake again? Heck, no. It means that I am finding new ways to treat myself that aren’t self-sabotaging.

I’m getting stronger.

If you had asked me in early December, I would have told you there’s nothing at my local gym that I could do. The treadmill hurt my knees. The recumbent bike hurt my hips. No matter what I tried to do, something hurt. You know what? That’s okay. I’m going slow- embarrassingly slow at times. But, I’m learning that my body can adjust to hard things and get stronger. When I started using the treadmill/ elliptical, my knees were swollen and painful for the first two weeks. Normally, I would have quit- because I have enough joint injuries without adding another problem area. However, I decided to see what would happen if I rested, iced, taped, and KEPT GOING. You know what happened? One day I realized my knees hadn’t hurt my entire workout. My body has challenges and limitations. It’ll never run a marathon or competitively lift weights- but it CAN get stronger. I can’t begin to explain how proud I am to have discovered that. For the first time in my adult life, I walk into the gym not embarrassed by what I can’t do but proud of how hard I’m trying.

Here’s the thing. I’ve hesitated to share this journey with my blog community for a few reasons. First, I could fall off the wagon. A month from now I might read this blog and think, “Bless that wide-eyed child. She was so naively full of hope.” If that happens, well, I’ll have this blog as proof that I CAN do hard things. I can get back on the wagon. (I CAN even make a fairly tasty grain free dinner roll! Woot! Woot!) Second, there will be readers of this blog that won’t be happy for me. I understand that. I understand how much energy is required just to LIVE with chronic illness. I know how comforting food can be when everything else is miserable. I don’t blame anyone with chronic illness for their current state. Life is HARD- and life with chronic illness seems almost impossible. You CAN do hard things- but maybe the hard things for right now involve waking up and showering. I’m proud of you for that. Wherever you are on your journey through symptom management, be proud of yourself for doing the hard things. I’m cheering for you, and I’m so glad I have this community cheering for me too.

Peace, love, and health always.

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A Message of Hope for World Rare Disease Day 2017

It’s World Rare Disease Day, and I feel more encouraged than ever this year. You see, years ago World Rare Disease Day was barely a blip on the social media radar. Few people knew about it, and even fewer cared. I’ve not even eaten lunch yet today, and I’m already seeing #WRDD17 trending on social media. Friends and family members have shared WRDD information- even those who are personally untouched by rare disease. It’s touching and encouraging to see the reach of rare disease advocacy expanding into new corners of my world.

I’m from a rare family. The scope of my immediate family covers multiple rare disease- so much so that my geneticist refers to me as a “geneticist’s treasure.” (In case you’re wondering, being a treasure chest of genetic abnormalities is way more of a curse than a blessing. The whole family would prefer to be uninteresting.)Roughly twenty years ago, my older brother was diagnosed with Wilson’s Disease- a rare genetic disorder which causes copper to build to toxic levels in the body. At the time, (when Internet and social networking were still limited) there was limited information about his disease available and even less support. My parents and brother did what they could to inform themselves, my brother and I, and others in direct contact with my brother, but at the time the spread of information was slow.

A few years passed, and my Mom was diagnosed with Retinitis Pigmentosa- a rare eye disease in which the back wall of the retina is damaged causing limited vision and eventual blindness. Again, she was alone in her diagnosis. The extent of empathy shown to her was the random people who tried to empathize with her condition by telling about that one time they had pink eye. (Lol, seriously, why do people try to empathize using completely unrelated situations?)No doubt there were a lot of lonely and scary days as she tried to process her diagnosis.

Fast forward to now. There are online support groups, research agencies report findings on social media and web sites, organizations like Global Genes make an effort to make patients’ voices heard. The world isn’t quiet as dark and hopeless as it was 15-20 years ago- when having a rare disease meant that you carried a personal responsibility to inform others. Are there still days when it’s frustrating to be rare? Heck, yeah. I imagine there always will be. But as a proud member of a family full of rare genes, I think the future looks bright. There are so many who are blessed with gifts of research, advocacy, and treatment that I believe will be able to help my family and I in the future.

So, on World Rare Disease Day 2017, raise your voice. Speak out. The time for silence is over. The louder our voices are the more likely we are to be heard. Awareness leads to research funding. Research leads to a cure. Care about rare, my friends.

Peace, love, and health.