Community Unity Opportunity.

I’ll be honest, I’m not at all grateful for illness- especially illness of the chronic variety. Fortunately, I’m not the type who believes that God made me sick to teach me some divine lesson, so I don’t feel any compulsion to be thankful for this portion of my life. Having said that, I realize that the longer I continue my journey of life with chronic illness, the more I am grateful for community. Before my symptoms reached a life altering level, I had no idea what it meant to be surrounded by support from people I had never met.
While I consider myself very much an introvert now, for most of my life I’ve been surrounded by people. I’ve been a participant in church groups and choirs, committees and classes, clubs and organizations. Now, my body can’t keep up with all those memberships. It requires a day’s preparation to make it to one event- forget trying multiple events in a day. And while that much socialization would be exhausting for me now, I still long to be around people who understand me. Now don’t misunderstand. I have wonderful family and friends. My husband handled my illness far better than I could have asked. My Mom still texts me first thing every morning to see how I slept and talks to me at night to hear about my day. I have great physical support- but I can always use more.
The first months of being sick/ disabled were the worst. I was too ashamed to reach out to friends who knew me pre-illness and too scared to reach out to new people. I thought the idea of joining online support groups was ridiculous. What kind of loser needs people she’s never met to help her navigate life? This kind of loser. Me. As I started looking for groups and forums for those living with chronic illness, I found people who could understand. I found kindness and compassion and empathy. I found people who didn’t think I was weird because I was too tired to both shower before an event and then actually attend that event. I discovered others who were living with the shame of not being able to keep their house as organized as they’d like. I even found friends who understood how it felt to decide not to have children- yet be simultaneously heartbroken by that decision.
Without my communities of online friends, I would have never discovered blogging or felt compelled to begin my own chronic illness communities both online and in person. I credit those friends who pulled me through the beginning of this awfulness with all that Crazy, Chronic Life has become. But, it occurs to me that I’ve yet to make an exhaustive list of all the ways you can participate in the CCL community. If there’s a community that interests you, join us. I promise; we’ll be glad to have you.

Crazy, Chronic Life- FB page– This is the main Facebook page where all new blogs and CCL updates post first. I also use this page for live videos and polls.

Facebook Crazy, Chronic Life Support Group– This group is for those with chronic illness- or their caregivers who may seek to understand more. Join us contests, silliness, and all the support you can handle.

Taylor County Public Library- Chronic Illness Support Group– If you live in or near Campbellsville, Kentucky, come join the in person support group and meet some of the (in my opinion) coolest people in Campbellsville!

Sorry for posting twice today. I’m trying to get all my “blog keeping” tasks caught up before I leave for Nashville.

Peace, love, and health, friends.

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