Sleep.

I’m really tired. I’m always tired- this is hardly a revelation. But, if I’m being entirely honest, I have the absolute worst sleep habits ever. I don’t apologize for my strange relationship with sleep, though, because I have done everything within my power to help the situation- to absolutely no avail.
Here’s where I get around to making a point. Please, (please, please, pretty please, with melty cheese on top) do not cast judgment on the sleep patterns of those with chronic pain. Occasionally, I hear my chronic illness/ pain friends commenting about how their family/ friends have told them they would feel better if they would sleep on a normal schedule. While I agree that would be super fabulous- are you actually kidding me? Do you truly believe anyone chooses to stay up all hours of the night? Of course not. When you don’t/ can’t sleep your mind becomes victim to all the “what ifs” of your condition, relationship, and general life. Who would choose to do that? No one.
Now, don’t get me wrong. I don’t think chronic pain patients are the only people who can’t sleep. I know mental illness and hormonal changes affect sleep patterns. I’ve heard that my parents of newborn friends are rather sleep deprived as well. Joe has sleep apnea, and sleeps with a CPAP. It’s a sleep disorder. That’s another legitimate concern. I’m truly not trying to act like I’m the only person with a sleep concern up in here. (Although, Joe sleeps like a sweet angel baby once he dons that CPAP mask- as if there’s never been a sin to enter his blessed life, and I’m a little jealous.) I’m sorry. I really am. I feel your struggle, and I’m not trying to detract from it.
But, seriously. To all the people who feel I- or my other chronic illness/ pain friends- should just go to bed at a reasonable hour, please keep this in mind:
When I go to bed at night, I am quite literally putting myself into a device of serious discomfort. If I lie on my left side, I have to worry about my left shoulder dislocating. More specifically, I know my left shoulder will dislocate if I don’t move to another position quickly enough. If I lie on my right side, I’m lying on the hip that dislocates. Even if it doesn’t dislocate- it hurts. It really hurts. If I lie on my back, I lose feeling in my arms and legs- which makes my 37 nightly restroom trips almost impossible. (Seriously, you try walking on numb legs.) I don’t even try lying on my stomach, because my back spasms to the point that I literally can’t move to sit up. (Again, seriously inconvenient for the whole 37 restroom trips situation.)
I am a human rotisserie. I spend my nights spinning in place- hoping I will find a place that is comfortable enough to doze.
So, please. If you have opinions about what time sick people should go to sleep, keep them to yourself. It’s not easy. I assure you- we have tried every supplement, sleep aid, magic ointment, and tea. We are trying. We are combating pain, adrenaline surges, and the general fear of the unknown. It’s not easy, and I assure you- your advice about going to bed at 9 or turning off devices at 6 do little, if anything, to help. Please, give us some grace to figure all this out. It isn’t easy to live like this during the waking hours, and it when it’s dark, it gets even harder.
Chronic illness/ pain friends, please keep in mind that not everyone keeps our strange hours. I’ve found solace in online support groups during the wee hours of the morning when it’s impossible for my husband to be awake. I’ve had to learn that it’s okay if Joe is resting well during the hours that I’m trying (without success) to sleep. Joe has had to learn that it’s okay to let me sleep well past the hour that functional adults typically sleep. If you are living in a relationship that is juggling chronic illness/ pain, you have to learn to be patient while the other one sleeps. There are typically 6-8 hours of the day that one of us is awake and the other is not- just because our bodies run on opposite schedules. We are often quirky ships in the night. That is not only okay- it’s part of the balance of this life.
While we’re being very honest here, I’d like to also mention that my dog wakes me up for a drink of water (in which she must actually be walked to her bowl because she’s scared of the dark) at least three times a night, and Joe is a blanket hog. Those are very real situations in which the advice of healthy people is always appreciated. I’m considering making both of them sleep in the bath tub.
Peace, love, and health, friends.

 

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2 thoughts on “Sleep.

  1. brilliantmindbrokenbody

    I wonder if a Medcline pillow might allow you to sleep comfortably on your left, since it takes your weight off your shoulder. I have one in another bedroom offgassing right now so I can try it for my GERD, but we are hoping it will help with my shoulders as well.

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